Webinar Archives

Presented by Dawn Wright, Chief Scientist at Esri, and Jenny Lentz, Education Specialist at the Aquarium of the Pacific. The story map is a relatively new medium for sharing not only data, photos, videos, sounds, and maps, but for telling a specific and compelling story by way of that content. Story map apps provide the user with sophisticated cartographic functionality that does not require advanced training in cartography or GIS. Story maps are essentially web map applications built from web maps, which in turn are built from web-accessible data (including OGC WMS, WFS). Depending on the chosen complexity of a story map, it can be built in anywhere from a few minutes to a few days. With the beauty and utility of underlays such as the Esri Ocean Basemap, as well as a small tsunami of ocean content percolating up through a host of open data sites, there are powerful stories being told about coastal zone management, conservation, exploration and other forms of scientific field work. These stories are informing, educating, entertaining, and inspiring decision-makers on a wide variety of coastal issues. This presentation will take the audience on a small tour of a growing catalog of coastal and ocean story maps, many of which are accessible via MarineCadastre.gov and NOAA’s Digital Coast. It will also highlight the various resources available for building and deploying story maps, and discuss the utility of this medium for presenting, not just photos and videos, but more analytical results. Learn more about Story Maps at http://storymaps.esri.com. Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

Presented by Lauren Wenzel, Acting Director of the NOAA National MPA Center; Dan Laffoley, Marine Vice Chair for IUCN's World Commission on Protected Areas; and, Alison Greenberg, Senior Manager for the Promise of Sydney at IUCN. This webinar focused oncoastal and marine recommendations and next steps from November's landmark global forum on world parks. Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, the EBM Tools Network, and MPA News.

Presented by Tim Wilkinson of the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Center. The Blue Carbon Mapping Toolkit is a unique suit of tools developed by AGEDI, GRID-Arendal, and UNEP-WCMC to broadly assess the impact of development on coastal marine ecosystems and the associated blue carbon stocks in Abu Dhabi. The tool consists of three components; a web based application to add, edit and validate areas of habitat; a mobile application for use in the field; and a public-facing site that enables decision makers to quickly assess blue carbon stocks in their area of interest. This webinar will dive into how the toolkit works to provide an accurate, evolving map of blue carbon habitats. Learn more at http://bluecarbon.unep-wcmc.org. Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

Presented by Jeremy Jackson of the Smithsonian Institution and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Jackson presented on the new report Status and Trends of Caribbean Coral Reefs: 1970-2012. The report is a result of a three-year joint effort of the International Coral Reef Initiative’s (ICRI) Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN), the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP). It is the most detailed and comprehensive study of its kind published to date and is the result of the work of nearly 200 experts over the course of three years. Average Caribbean coral cover declined by half but varies greatly among locations with some sites showing little or no decline. The principal drivers of reef degradation so far have been local impacts of overfishing and coastal development that are potentially reversible by local action. Banning destructive fishing and strengthening coastal zone management would increase resilience of Caribbean reefs to the inevitable future impacts of climate change. Download the report at www.iucn.org/knowledge/publications_doc/publications/?uPubsID=5035. Webinar cosponsored by the EBM Tools Network and the National MPA Center.

Presented by Jason Blau and Lee Green of Redstone Strategy Group, and hosted by OpenChannels.org and the EBM Tools Network. Existing studies have helped define what good ocean planning (also known as Maritime or Marine Spatial Planning) looks like, the possible conservation and community benefits, and how it theoretically could cut costs and create economic value. However, little evidence has been compiled previously to show the actual results of ocean plans. This webinar previewed the results of a new empirical study of the economic, environmental, and social impacts of five established ocean plans: Massachusetts, Rhode Island, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, Norway’s Barents Sea, and Belgium. The study shows that on net, all of these plans resulted in broadly shared benefits. Economically, they delivered on average US$60 million per year in economic value from new industries (primarily wind) and retained value in existing industries. Environmentally, plans increased marine protection, ensured industry avoids sensitive habitat, cut carbon, and reduced the risk of oil spills. Socially, the plans encouraged constructive engagement, broad participation, and marine research, transcending the plans themselves. This webinar walked through the detailed results, including the benefits and costs of the ocean plans. Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

Presented by Steven Lutz and Christian Neumann of GRID-Arendal. Blue carbon projects can work! A new report entitled ‘Building Blue Carbon Projects: An Introductory Guide’ showcases how using the value of carbon stored and sequestered in marine and coastal ecosystems can support conservation and sustainable management. This report aims to stimulate the discussion around projects that use a blue carbon approach, while also highlighting common blue carbon project elements and key issues from existing projects. Presented within the report are several case studies, including the Global Environment Facility's Blue Forests Project. This four-year global project is in its inception phase and aims to demonstrate how the values of carbon and other ecosystem services can be used to stimulate improved and sustainable ecosystem management. The project will be discussed in further detail in this webinar. Download ‘Building Blue Carbon Projects: An Introductory Guide’ at: http://bluecarbonportal.org/blog/blue-carbon-projects-can-work-new-report-shows. Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

Presented by Steven Lutz of GRID-Arendal and Angela Martin of Blue Climate Solutions. In response to the call by the United Nations to provide innovative solutions to address the climate challenge and to prevent global biodiversity loss, GRID-Arendal, a centre collaborating with the United Nations Environment Programme, and Blue Climate Solutions, a project of The Ocean Foundation, have produced a report on the potential of marine vertebrates carbon services to readily fill this void. The report presents eight Fish Carbon mechanisms and raises options for the future of international climate change mitigation efforts and ocean management. The report includes a preface by Sylvia Earle, Founder of Mission Blue and a former Chief Scientist of NOAA, who notes that “acknowledging the importance of marine life in climate change will not only provide much needed opportunities in climate mitigation, but will simultaneously enhance food security for coastal and island communities, while safeguarding biodiversity and marine ecosystems on a global scale, particularly in the unprotected high seas.” An Advance Copy of the report was launched on 9 November 2014 in Abu Dhabi and is available online at www.grida.no/publications/fish-carbon. Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

Presented by Kerri Cahill, Branch Chief, National Park Service, Denver Service Center; Ellen Eubanks, Project Leader, Landscape Architect, Forest Service, San Dimas Technology & Development Center; and, Charles Wahle, Senior Scientist, NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center. The United States has a diverse system of national parks, monuments, wildlife refuges, marine protected areas, estuarine research reserves, conservation areas, recreation areas, wilderness areas, wild and scenic rivers, and scenic and historic trails managed by a number of different federal agencies. The Interagency Visitor Use Management Council, with representatives from the US National Park Service, US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Army Corps of Engineers, and NOAA, is developing effective and legally defensible implementation tools for assessing, planning, and managing visitor use and visitor capacity on US public lands and waters. The Council’s collaborative efforts provide a consistent approach to visitor use management that will in turn create seamless connections between lands and waters managed by different federal agencies. In this webinar, representatives from the Interagency Visitor Use Management Council presented on guidance being developed to encourage sustainable recreation on federal lands and waters. This webinar was cosponsored by the EBM Tools Network and the National MPA Center.

Presented by Carri Hulet of The Consensus Building Institute, Tonna-Marie Surgeon-Rogers of Waquoit Bay NERR, and Steve Miller of Great Bay NERR. Role-play simulations are experiential exercises that help community residents and decision-makers learn more about the scientific or technical issues being debated in various public policy controversies, such as whether and how to adapt to the risks associated with climate change. The New England Climate Adaptation Project (NECAP), a partnership of the Consensus Building Institute, the MIT Science Impact Collaborative, and the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, is working with four at-risk coastal New England communities to: assess local climate change risks, 2) identify key challenges and opportunities for adaptation, and 3) test the use of role-play simulations as a means to educate the public about climate change threats and to help communities explore ways of decreasing their vulnerability and enhancing their resilience to climate change impacts. As part of this project, science-based role-play simulations were developed for each of the four partner municipalities. Tailored specifically for each community, these simulations were designed to engage participants in a mock decision-making process about a key climate change risk facing their community, such as the possibility of severe sea level rise and related impacts on coastal infrastructure. Simulations were based upon local climate change projections, risk assessments, and in-depth discussions with key community members and public officials in each town or city. This webinar will discuss the development and use of these simulations in two of these communities. This webinar was cosponsored by the EBM Tools Network and EcoAdapt.

Presented by Patrick Crist and Kat Maybury of NatureServe. Tribal, agency, conservation organization, and private sector managers are engaged in landscape-scale planning to conserve and sustainably manage natural and cultural resources in the North Pacific region of the United States and Canada. Tools that facilitate this work vary greatly, and managers often find it very difficult and time consuming to select tools appropriate for their work. Through funding from the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative, NatureServe has created a guide to tools that support landscape-level conservation in the face of climate change for natural resources managers in that region. This guide, based on surveys of tool needs for the region, emphasizes tools currently in use in the North Pacific region of the United States and Canada and augments with other proven tools. Much of the guide is also applicable to landscape-scale conservation planning in other regions as well. For this work, tools were defined broadly as applications that facilitate: 1) gathering and distributing relevant data (e.g. regional databases that support queries and downloads), 2) conducting analyses and modeling (e.g. vulnerability assessments), 3) visualizing data and analysis/modeling results (including current and potential future conditions), and 4) integrating information into planning for conservation, land use, and land management. This webinar discussion will provide a brief overview of the guide and tools. This webinar was co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

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