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Webinar Archives

Webinar Title Description Date
Toolkit for Engaging Local Communities in MPA Management

Presented by Matt Ferris-Smith, Samantha Miller, Joe Otts, and Michelle Zilinkskas of the University of Michigan. This webinar will present a toolkit to enhance the capacity of marine protected areas to effectively engage with local communities. Based on interviews with MPA managers, staff, and community members from across the United States, the toolkit addresses topics including building trust and understanding with community members, increasing collaboration with communities, increasing awareness and knowledge of protected areas, and fostering stewardship behavior. It was developed by graduate students from the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and the Environment in collaboration with NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center. Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, EBM Tools Network, and MPA News.

April 10, 2014
Global Ocean Refuge System to Protect Marine Life Worldwide (GLORES)

Presented by Lance Morgan of the Marine Conservation Institute. Global Ocean Refuge System (GLORES) is a science-based strategy for advancing marine protected areas worldwide. GLORES expands existing efforts by: 1) using a scientifically sound biogeographic framework for protecting ecosystems; 2) establishing clear, transparent criteria for the best locations, strong protection, effective management, and credible enforcement to save species and their habitats from preventable harm; 3) fostering improved cooperation among nonprofit and for-profit organizations to achieve GLORES goals; and 4) incentivizing competition among countries and international governmental organizations for the prestige and economic benefits of earning Global Ocean Refuge status for the best existing and new marine protected areas. GLORES will incorporate the best thinking of marine biologists, oceanographers, fisheries scientists, geographers, economists, market researchers, business people, and others, and it will support governments with marine jurisdictions to save at least 10% of every ocean biogeographic region by 2020, and 20% by 2030. Learn more about GLORES at http://globaloceanrefuge.org. Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, the EBM Tools Network, and MPA News.

March 13, 2014
Monitoring and Evaluation of Spatially Managed Marine Areas (MESMA)

Presented by Oscar Bos of IMARES, and Vanessa Stelzenmüller of the Thünen-Institute of Sea Fisheries. Created by the European Community, the MESMA framework is a step-wise approach to the evaluation and monitoring of spatially managed marine areas. The framework provides guidance on the selection, mapping, and assessment of ecosystem components and human pressures. It also addresses the evaluation of management effectiveness and potential adaptations to management, including governance.  The webinar will highlight the framework and geospatial tools for implementing it. Learn more about MESMA at http://www.mesma.org. This webinar was co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, OpenChannels.org, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network.

February 25, 2014
Ecosystem Services Harmonization in Theory and Practice

Presented by Evangelia Drakou of the EC's Joint Research Centre. The scientific community and policy makers recognize marine and coastal ecosystem services (MCES) as extremely important for human survival. Peer reviewed assessments to date, however, have used a variety of terms and classifications for ES which have caused confusion and misinterpretation of the results and hindered communication among involved parties. The European Commission’s Joint Research Centre research group has reviewed the scientific literature to assess the state of the art of existing MCES assessments, identify gaps and limitations, and propose ways forward. A wide variety of methodologies, terminologies, and ES classification systems were identified. Based on the existing approaches, the research group also identified the main research gaps, proposed an integrated ES classification system, and gave clear definitions of ES tailored to the marine environment. This webinar will demonstrate this work and will go beyond the scientific component by exploring potential practical implications. We will discuss the applicability of the integrated MCES classification system for systematically organizing MCES information and enabling interoperability among existing MCES online platforms. Learn more about this project at http://ges.jrc.ec.europa.eu. This webinar was co-sponsored by Marine Ecosystem Services Partnership and the EBM Tools Network.

February 5, 2014
Valuing Ecosystem Services in the Face of Climate Change in North Carolina and Hawaii

Presented by Ken Bagstad of USGS. To correctly value ecosystem services both today and when considering future climate change and adaptation strategies, we must properly account for service supply by ecosystems, demand by people, and service flows from ecosystems to people. This webinar will present two case studies of the use of two spatially explicit approaches to providing this information: a biophysical modeling tool, the Artificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) system and a survey-based approach to map cultural ecosystem services, Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES). These modeling and valuation tools are being used in partnership with several Federal agencies to answer questions about climate change and adaptation in coastal North Carolina and for coral reefs in Maui. Learn more about ARIES at www.ariesonline.org and SolVES at http://solves.cr.usgs.gov. Webinar co-hosted by the EBM Tools Network and EcoAdapt.

January 22, 2014
Coastal Resilience 2.0

Presented by Zach Ferdaña and Nicole Love of The Nature Conservancy. Coastal Resilience 2.0 is a suite of interactive tools to help decision-makers assess risk and identify nature-based solutions to reduce socio-economic vulnerability to coastal hazards. The tools allow users to interactively examine storm surge, sea level rise, natural resources, and economic assets and to develop risk reduction and restoration solutions in an easy-to-use web-based map interface. Since their first release, the Coastal Resilience tools have been used extensively including in disaster preparedness planning in Connecticut, mangrove and reef restoration in Grenada, oyster reef restoration planning in the Gulf of Mexico, and sea-level rise planning in the Florida Keys. Coastal Resilience 2.0 features major enhancements including U.S. national and global applications and innovative “apps”. In addition to the U.S. national and global applications, the tools cover eight U.S. states (Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New York, Connecticut, New Jersey), two specific U.S. locations (Puget Sound, WA, and Ventura County, CA), four countries in Latin America (Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras), and three island nations in the Caribbean (Grenada, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, U.S Virgin Islands). Learn more at www.maps.coastalresilience.org and www.nature.org/newsfeatures/pressreleases/the-nature-conservancy-and-partners-release-version-20-of-coastal-resilience.xml. Webinar co-sponsored by the The EBM Tools Network and EcoAdapt.

January 14, 2014
MPAs as Sentinel Sites

Presented by Steve Gittings of NOAA. “Sentinel sites” are areas with the capacity for sustained ocean observations to track environmental change. Within national marine sanctuaries, these observations are focused on ecological integrity and early warning indicators in order to inform decisions by resource managers. Monitoring data, characterization and applied research efforts are the backbone of the sentinel site program. The presentation will illustrate how Sanctuaries are serving as sentinel sites.  Environmental monitoring  plays an integral role in management actions such as response, mitigation, restoration, management plan review, permitting, enforcement, and education. Sanctuaries are also designing web capabilities to deliver sentinel site information to managers and other users. Webinar co-hosted by the NOAA National MPA CenterMPA News, EcoAdapt, and The EBM Tools Network.

January 9, 2014
Assessing Habitat and Community Sensitivity to Climate Change Impacts

Presented by Jeff Crooks of the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve and Dwight Trueblood of NOAA. The National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERRS) are uniquely positioned across the U.S. to assess climate change impacts and the sensitivity of representative coastal habitats to them.  The NERRS Climate Sensitivity Study identified key anthropogenic and climatic stressors affecting each reserve’s ecological and social landscape and then analyzed the social and bio-physical sensitivity to these stressors. Presenters will share key findings from this study, and the Tijuana River Reserve in California will discuss their collaborative efforts to develop a vulnerability assessment that informs an Adaptation Strategy to address sea level rise and riverine flooding. Webinar co-hosted by the NOAA National MPA CenterMPA News, and The EBM Tools Network.

December 12, 2013
Demonstration of Marinexplore

Presented by John Graybeal and Chris Kalima of Marinexplore. Making sense of the increasing volume of complex ocean data is a difficult and time-consuming task. Marinexplore is a “big data platform” to help offshore industry, marine logistics, scientists, and government organizations reduce data processing time and make informed decisions faster. Marinexplore handles all spatial data types; relates data to location, depth, and time; and allows for visualization and analysis of diverse data types on a single platform. Learn more at Marinexplore.org. Webinar co-hosted by the EBM Tools Network.

December 3, 2013
Impacts of Sea Level Rise on National Parks

Presented by Rebecca Beavers and Courtney Schupp of the US National Park Service. Climate change and sea level rise will challenge National Park efforts to protect natural and cultural resources and to provide visitor access and recreational opportunities.  Learn how several national parks are addressing these challenges: collecting baseline data on archaeological sites that are vulnerable to rising water levels and associated changes in biological activity and visitor use; incorporating barrier island processes into long-term development plans including visitor facilities; and engaging in a regional multi-agency effort to restore coastal areas impacted by a major hurricane.Webinar co-hosted by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and The EBM Tools Network.

November 14, 2013

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